About

Story-telling must be the second oldest profession in the world. If you want to make a point or drive a message home, tell a story….or a fable, a folk-tale, and a joke will do just as well. This blog here, `A Little Spiritual Chewing-gum…’, will feature all of these and also poems, haiku, mulla nasrudin stories and other short pieces as well as photographs, visuals that attempt to impart some spiritual wisdom. Hopefully all these will give readers something to chew on and make them `spiritually’ fat….Ideas, suggestions, contributions are welcome…..

This blog created by Mahesh R.

Advertisements

One Response to About

  1. Why Charity is better than Prayer
    by Rabbi Allen S. Maller

    The following story was told by a Hassidic rabbi: “I had a dream,” said Rabbi Meir, “in which my soul ascended to heaven and came to Gan Eden (paradise). I sat down at its gates. There, I saw a very religious Jew demanding to be let in.”

    “Who are you? What merits do you have to deserve entry into Gan Eden?” the angel in charge asked.

    “I am a very pious Rabbi. All my life I studied and taught Torah. Surely, I deserve to enter through these gates,” the very pious rabbi replied.

    The angel wasn’t impressed. “You will have to wait,” she replied. “We have to check if your studying Torah was truly for God’s sake, or was it to show off how smart you are.”

    Then another distinguished Jew arrived at the gates of Gan Eden and wanted to enter. “Who are you? And why do you deserve entry to Gan Eden?” questioned the angel.

    “My entire life I devoted to God. I spent all my days in prayer. Surely I deserve Gan Eden; for whom else was Gan Eden created?” he replied.

    “Not so fast,” replied the angel. “Although you may have done everything you claim, we must be sure that it was done with purity, sincerity and love. You will have to wait until we check it out thoroughly.”

    As the angel is still arguing with this man, another Jew appears at the gates. “I would like to go into Gan Eden,” he declared. “Who are you and what did you accomplish during your lifetime that makes you worthy to enter Gan Eden?” asks the angel.

    “I am a very simple person and earned my living from an inn at the roadside. Whenever travelers came hungry and tired, I made sure to give them food and lodging. If a person was poor I charged less or didn’t charge at all. I tried my best to honestly serve all my guests, including the non-Jewish ones, and I always answered their questions about Jewish beliefs. I did as many Mitsvot (responsible deeds) as I could, but I am sure I didn’t do as many as these pious people. Perhaps I’m not worthy of entering Gan Eden, especially seeing that these pious rabbis and scholars are kept waiting.”

    “Come right in!” exclaimed the angel. Then the angel explained, “We have to check all the others to see whether their deeds were really pure and sincere. However, helping people in need and giving them food, lodging and knowledge of Torah does not need any checking. It doesn’t matter why you did it, as long as the other person was helped!”

    “Prayer and piety are mitzvot that require the purest of intentions to be done properly” said Rabbi Meir. “With charity however, the reason or motive doesn’t matter, as long as the other person was helped!”

    Why Charity is better than Prayer
    by Rabbi Allen S. Maller

    The following story was told by a Hassidic rabbi: “I had a dream,” said Rabbi Meir, “in which my soul ascended to heaven and came to Gan Eden (paradise). I sat down at its gates. There, I saw a very religious Jew demanding to be let in.”

    “Who are you? What merits do you have to deserve entry into Gan Eden?” the angel in charge asked.

    “I am a very pious Rabbi. All my life I studied and taught Torah. Surely, I deserve to enter through these gates,” the very pious rabbi replied.

    The angel wasn’t impressed. “You will have to wait,” she replied. “We have to check if your studying Torah was truly for God’s sake, or was it to show off how smart you are.”

    Then another distinguished Jew arrived at the gates of Gan Eden and wanted to enter. “Who are you? And why do you deserve entry to Gan Eden?” questioned the angel.

    “My entire life I devoted to God. I spent all my days in prayer. Surely I deserve Gan Eden; for whom else was Gan Eden created?” he replied.

    “Not so fast,” replied the angel. “Although you may have done everything you claim, we must be sure that it was done with purity, sincerity and love. You will have to wait until we check it out thoroughly.”

    As the angel is still arguing with this man, another Jew appears at the gates. “I would like to go into Gan Eden,” he declared. “Who are you and what did you accomplish during your lifetime that makes you worthy to enter Gan Eden?” asks the angel.

    “I am a very simple person and earned my living from an inn at the roadside. Whenever travelers came hungry and tired, I made sure to give them food and lodging. If a person was poor I charged less or didn’t charge at all. I tried my best to honestly serve all my guests, including the non-Jewish ones, and I always answered their questions about Jewish beliefs. I did as many Mitsvot (responsible deeds) as I could, but I am sure I didn’t do as many as these pious people. Perhaps I’m not worthy of entering Gan Eden, especially seeing that these pious rabbis and scholars are kept waiting.”

    “Come right in!” exclaimed the angel. Then the angel explained, “We have to check all the others to see whether their deeds were really pure and sincere. However, helping people in need and giving them food, lodging and knowledge of Torah does not need any checking. It doesn’t matter why you did it, as long as the other person was helped!”

    “Prayer and piety are mitzvot that require the purest of intentions to be done properly” said Rabbi Meir. “With charity however, the reason or motive doesn’t matter, as long as the other person was helped!”

    Rabbi Maller’s web site is: rabbimaller.com

    Rabbi Maller’s web site is: rabbimaller.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s